1800sBiographyPolitical

Book Details

Author : Russell Freedman
Category : Biographies,Teen & Young Adult,Subjects,Political
Formats : Paperback,Kindle Edition,Audio CD,Library Binding,Unknown Binding,Hardcover,Audible Audiobook,Mass Market Paperback,School & Library Binding
Languages : English
Pages : 165
Price : Check Price in Amazon
PublishDate : 1989-09-25
ReleaseDate : 1989-09-25

Book Summary & Description

  • Abraham Lincoln Stood Out In A Crowd As Much For His Wit And Rollicking Humor As For His Height.

  • This Newbery Medal-Winning Biography Of Our Civil War President Is Warm, Appealing, And Illustrated With Dozens Of Carefully Chosen Photographs And Prints.Russell Freedman Begins With A Lively Account Of Abraham Lincolns Boyhood, His Career As A Country Lawyer, And His Courtship And Marriage To Mary Todd.

  • Then The Author Focuses On The Presidential Years (1861 To 1865), Skillfullly Explaining The Many Complex Issues Lincoln Grappled With As He Led A Deeply Divided Nation Through The Civil War.

  • The Books Final Chapter Is A Moving Account Of That Tragic Evening In Fords Theatre On April 14, 1865.

  • Concludes With A Sampling Of Lincoln Writings And A Detailed List Of Lincoln Historical Sites.

  • This Title Has Been Selected As A Common Core Text Exemplar (Grades 2-3, Read Aloud Informational Text).

Video Review

Book Reviews

The many facts, especially direct quotes, of Lincoln were intriguing and some funny. Lincoln agreed with others that he was rather homely referring once to his poor, lean, lank face. When a rival called him two-faced during a political debate, Lincoln replied: I leave it to my audience If I had another face, do you think Id wear this one?This book reads more like an adventure than a biography, but contains everything one could hope to learn from a biography. The many facts, especially direct quotes, of Lincoln were intriguing and some funny. Lincoln agreed with others that he was rather homely referring once to his poor, lean, lank face. When a rival called him two-faced during a political debate, Lincoln replied: I leave it to my audience If I had another face, do you think Id wear this one?

This book reads more like an adventure than a biography, but contains everything one could hope to learn from a biography. Great little book – good for elementary age (if you believe in old fashioned education) or Jr High age (if you believe in the dumbed-down public education model we live with today. Overal I would recommend the book and buy again as a gift for another in the future or for younger children 6 to older. . . if nothing else it has pictures. My son is using this book for another school project and enjoys the book very much. Im sure that there are plenty of biographies out there on President Lincoln, but I have not seen any that give us as good a kid-friendly view on him until this one. The book presents a great summary of Lincolns life and– most impressively– even tackles some of the darker moments, as is approriate for the target elementary/middle school audience.

The book is very interesting reading, even for adults, and is written in such a way to capture the readers interest from the beginning. President and they answer “Abraham Lincoln,” then you have probably learned two quick things about that person: they hold social justice as a higher ideal above all others, and they believe that THEY love President Lincoln more than anyone else has before them. Mr. Freedman reminds us that Lincoln was a man of humble beginnings; he knew poverty through most of his early life. Did you know that Lincoln had buried his mother by the age of 9 and his only sibling by the age of 18?I swore I wasn’t going to cry again at the end of another book about Lincoln, so instead I spread it out by crying in jags throughout the book. I cried at the image of Lincoln, sitting alone before a debate with the great orator, Stephen Douglas.

I cried that Frederick Douglass, the most influential black leader at the time, who originally criticized Lincoln for not doing enough, ultimately changed his mind and said of him, “He was the first great man that I talked with in the United States freely, who in no single instance reminded me of the difference between himself and myself, of the difference of color. “Lincoln wasn’t just the Great Emancipator, he was a man who was tasked with a nightmare: to break apart a nation to make it whole again. The way the author wrote about him made me really appreciate and care for Lincoln a lot more than I did (and I’m British) and I felt heartbroken when (view spoiler)[he got assassinated (hide spoiler)], but now I want to know what happened to his wife after that because that would have been traumatising.

As an adult who studied history as any other student throughout school, I never really paid attention to Lincoln in any way other than knowing that he is on the penny and the five dollar bill and abolished slavery. Freedman’s account opened up whole new worlds of understanding that brilliantly blazed the simple but amazing life of a man who loved books and what they taught him and vowed to do good in the world until he couldn’t anymore. This was a wonderful blend of history and storytelling that cleverly unveiled a human being and the fear and pain and struggle that he must have encountered that failed to be recorded in any history book I have read. Unlike Daniel Boone (the dreadfully racist and worshipful 1940 Newbery Medal winner), Freedman treats Lincoln as a real person and a true hero.

I love the “Lincoln Sampler” in the end, which features a collection of both well and lesser known quotes. This book won the Newbery Award so I know it was written for teens, but I thoroughly enjoyed it as an adult who is not a big history buff. I’ve read books about this period of history, but, always with so much detail that I found it all pretty muddled by the time I got through. I keep hearing people say that the civil war wasn’t about slavery when the entire reason for the war was that the north was trying to prevent the spread of slavery into the western territory and the south was fighting to spread slavery. I’ve also heard that Lincoln didn’t care about slavery, well, he was talking about it and opposed to it way before his presidency and it’s all clearly documented.

I have definitely learn a whole bunch of facts about Abraham Lincoln that totally blew my mind. At the point of me reading this photo biography, I had been learning about the Civil War and Abe Lincoln’s presidency which was one of the reasons I picked this book up; to learn more about the character I had previously been learning about. This book secured a lot of the facts that I had misconceived about, while learning about Abraham Lincoln. His life is just truly extraordinary and you will be amazed too if you read this mindbogglingly book. There is a great focus on the Civil War, and his roles during the Civil War. With primary quotes and photographs and loaded with information and content, students can learn a great deal about President Lincoln.

I enjoyed the pictures and the basic information it gave about Lincolns life. I really liked that so many quotes from people who knew Lincoln were included, it helped me relate to him more personally. Lincoln: A Photobiography maintains a formal narrative distance from the reader, yet manages to string out a captivating life, up to the point where I was sobbing at the death I knew from the beginning would end the tale. He also, without overtly stating it makes the case that this one person, Abraham Lincoln, held in his hands the directional destiny of our country. As at the moment, I have an awe-inspiring 5th grader who is gobbling up biographies and US history books like they were M&Ms. My hope is that – any child who gives this book a chance will be rewarded with a sense of pride and gratitude that such an intelligent and empathetic man was willing to give himself to our country.

This Newbery Medal winner of 1988 is a fact-filled book that reads like a novel. Hundreds of books have been written about Abraham Lincoln and a feature film directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Daniel Day Lewis is in production; grab this book and share it with children before seeing that film to learn important facts about the man who governed the nation through the bloodiest war on American soil. This book does a fantastic job of including first-hand accounts of the backwoods boy who became a successful lawyer, statesman and leader of the United States. The author draws the reader in with his tales of Lincoln’s adventure down the Ohio River to New Orleans, his struggles to make his own way in the world apart from his family and his break-up and ultimate marriage to Mary Todd.

Lincoln: A Photobiography has won the Newbery Medal, the Jefferson Cup Award, and the Golden Kite Honor Book Award, and earned a citation as School Library Journal Best Book of the Year. This book tells a detailed story about Abraham Lincoln and is accompanied by 90 black and white photographs and prints. It provides a detailed and vivid look at the life and times of Abraham Lincoln and also mentions other great leaders during this time period. Not only did it mention his childhood, family life, and adulthood, it described in detail his work concerning law and politics, the emancipation, the war, and his death. The 90 photographs which accompanied the text helped draw the reader in, and added to the credibility and appeal of the book.

2) Summary: This book gives an interesting account of Lincolns legacy from his early childhood to his role as the 16th president through text and actual black and white photographs. a) I enjoyed the actual black and white photographs found within the book. c) I really liked the actual written text of Lincolns autobiography (pg. D) Curriculum Connections: This book could be used as a reference to not only look up various stages in Lincoln’s life, but also for more information about the Civil War. The details about him surprised me; I knew, of course, that he was extremely tall and had had a limited formal education, but I had no idea his voice was high pitched and that he had so much trouble finding a good general during the Civil War and that he was shy.

And Lincolns assassination was so unexpected, coming so close to the end of the war. I could really feel Lincolns anguish in trying to figure out how to lure back the rebel states without cruelty yet also closing the door forever on slavery. As a Newbery Medal winner, the award given for “the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children,” I suppose I am not really the intended audience for this book. Nonetheless, it is written in a fluid style that will appeal to adults who might be interested in a concise, “one-day read” biography of Lincoln. All these years I thought that “you can fool some people some time, but you can’t fool all the people all the time” was a Bob Marley original (“Get Up, Stand Up”) when in fact he was paraphrasing (plagiarising?)I like how it offered very in depth info on President Lincoln’s life.

Reading this book again was like visiting a dear old friend who was as wonderful as I remembered. Picking this up 15+ years after I first encountered this as in elementary school, I am struck by how well the book has held up after all this time. Some history books written for children are obviously geared towards children. I read about how Lincoln grew up, going to school when he could (a winter here, a few weeks there), how his family constantly moved, his obsession with books that “doesn’t seem natural. “I follow Lincoln as he suffers through numerous business failures, makes up for it with unflappable work ethic, and through studying works his way up to becoming a surveyor and later lawyer.

Just as Lincoln ascends to the state Legislature, the place where he spent his early adulthood begins to decline, quickly becoming as ghost town. Numerous conflicts break out, and Lincoln is always involved, from being part of the local militia to fend off an invasion by Native Americans (surviving plenty of mosquitoes), to protesting the Mexican-American War, and eventually leading the Civil War. A short section departs from the book and weaves in the situation and perception of slavery and its spread. Far from the haigographied, impeccable figure, known by his peerless oration and famous beard, Freedman reminded me that Lincoln was very human.

I didn’t) opens the way for slavery to expand, shaking Lincoln out of his self-imposed political exile and into the Lincoln-Douglas debates, whose format is used by forensics teams everywhere. He battles crippling depression and has to deal with the number of close relatives and friends that drop dead around him, from his sister and mother, to a business partner whose debt Lincoln made good over 15 years, to Lincoln’s classic rival Stephen Douglas, and even to his own son. Rather than the clean and antiseptic view expected of war in a children’s book, it begins with Lincoln’s inauguration, with Washington being placed on full military alert, complete with snipers lining the rooftops and a battery of howitzers overlooking the unfinished Capitol building.

As Lincoln gradually takes a more active role in “commanding the commanders,” his is stymied by generals who first drill their men endlessly, then years of bloody debacles, then isolated victories in far-flung theaters of war. In the midst, he issues the Emancipation Proclamation after a lengthy debate about whether it is even Constitutionally possible, allows thousands of executions of war deserters (though pardoning many on both sides), and gradually comes to see the war as a moral crusade. His Gettysburg address is so short that a photographer who set up as Lincoln took the podium did not have a chance to take a picture. No one, not even Lincoln himself, thinks that reelection is possible until a sudden string of victories signals the turning of the tide.

The description of the bullet’s path is not minced, nor are the hopeless efforts of local doctors and the fact that Lincoln is so tall he has to be laid diagonally on the bed. How else would I still remember Lincoln’s wrestling match with Jack Armstrong, leader of the Clary’s Grove boys and a footnote in history otherwise?The contrast in heights between Lincoln and the Stephen “Little Giant” Douglas, whose differently sized photos are juxtaposed?It is true, of course, that the book, at its heart, is a kid’s book. Perhaps it is the fact that there are enough details and side details that it seems like a real biography, rather than yet another ripoff version targeted at grade school kids in history class meant to make a quick buck. Lincolns older sister was running the family home at 11, at least temporarily, and died giving birth to her first child.

Lincoln pardoned a lot of execution sentences during the Civil War, but even so a lot of men were executed for desertion and other war-time offenses. Freedman oversimplifies the unique circumstances of Lincolns first Presidential campaign, and the election that followed. The overall result is a fantastic insight into Lincoln for school-age readers, and a welcome reminder for anyone who appreciates a great life story. The book Lincoln: A Photobiography by Russell Freedman is a biography and a multiple award-winning book, its awards include: Newbery Medal, the Jefferson Cup Award, and the Golden Kite Honor Book Award, and earned a citation as School Library Journal Best Book of the Year. It provides a detailed and vivid look at the life and times of Abraham Lincoln and mentions other great leaders during that time period.

A lot of things in this reading surprised me and introduced me to stuff I never knew about Abraham Lincoln. I also loved the fact that though he had a total of a year of schooling he could read and study himself for two years and pass his bar exam. And Lincolns assassination was so unexpected, coming so close to the end of the war. I could really feel Lincolns anguish in trying to figure out how to lure back the rebel states without cruelty yet also closing the door forever on slavery. This means a good part of that reading involves Lincoln, simply because he is such a powerful figure in our nation’s development. Though I imagine I have read at least 40 books devoted to Lincoln over the years, I never even considered reading this one before taking this course.

Additionally, I can see this book as a great book for middle school teachers to use to connect an 8th grade American history class with an 8th grade English class. In trying to find a good book about Lincoln for my 12 year old niece, I stumbled upon this one, the winner of the 1988 Newbery. I was impressed with the tone of the book- the author managed to streamline and simplify concepts to make them age appropriate for middle grade readers, and yet, it never felt dumbed down or condescending. In a fairly compact book, the highlights of Lincoln’s life are all covered and explained in relatable ways.

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